My autistic learning mind

No erroneous application of Kodak moments can illustrate how my autistic mind learns.  It sees and remembers all visual stimuli so fast it’s dizzying to me.  Calming the indigenous areas of my frontal cortex takes monumental strengths to align autism to.  When I see words I know them forever, not temporarily.  I don’t ever need to spell check anything.

When I was two I could read.  I didn’t need to be taught, I just learned.  Mom always read to me, so I just aligned words ultimately immortalized in my autistic mind.

Having been able to read for so long I have memorized volumes upon volumes of information.  So much that it drives me nutty sometimes.  Glaring memories of words can haunt me evermore.

Autism has gifted me with the ability to succeed academically if I’m able to conquer other challenges, like ADHD, and anxiety, and sensory alignment.  I am thankful to God for the gifts of autism, and hope for His help with the challenges.  So many people struggle with reading every day, and I don’t.  I’m very lucky.Image

 

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13 thoughts on “My autistic learning mind

  1. Hi Henry, your blog is extremely helpful to me. I am a special educator of students with autism. I have concentrated my efforts on communication and academic development. Even though I try to provide the best educational experience I can with age appropriate material, I couldn’t bring my autistic students to grade level work. But the amazing pioneers, Soma Mukhopadhyay, you, and others have given me much hope. When parents have fought the psychologists in my IEP meetings over the dual diagnosis of autism and mental retardation, I was never comfortable adding that latter diagnosis, but how could we refute it, other than simply saying we don’t BELIEVE they’re mentally retarded? Soma, Ido, and YOU have changed all that. Her system of communicating is so powerful! The more I read, watch, and learn of her methods and clients, the more I am a believer that people with autism can communicate intelligently and provide the world with so much beauty and understanding with their words. During the summer, I take on a few projects. This is mine this year and it’s totally consuming me. I am continuing to expand my search for other nonverbal autistics showing age level intelligence. Can you help? Do you know where I can find other blogs, websites, or YouTube videos, such as yours that comes from the fingers of nonverbal autistics? Lastly, I just wanted to say that your words are amazing and encouraging to hear, encouraging me to begin RPM sessions with my own students. Don’t stop writing, no matter how difficult! It inspires countless of others and just might be part of the catalyst that changes the system of education for others!

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      • That was great, Marlen. Thank you! I even followed some links that were up there and one led me straight to a list of nonverbal autistics on the internet (blogs, Facebook, and YouTube). Cheers!

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    • Hi Ryan, this is Henry’s mom. Henry has read your comment and will reply. I have been meaning to make a resource page with links to other non verbal autistic bloggers. I have a bunch saved, but off the top of my head there is Emma’s Hope Book, and actually if you look at her resources page she has a list there. On you tube you can search Sue Finnes, whose son Chris uses rpm. I have videos of Henry doing rpm that I also plan to link up here. Now that I know this blog is actually garnering readers I plan to put some more things here, but I want it all to be Henry’s voice, not mine. Regarding IQ and diagnosis of mental retardation, Henry was tested as being at an IQ of 35. So, I know full well what the parents you speak of feel. I often wonder how it’s considered ethical to administer tests that a child can’t interact with and consider it’s results an accurate measure of intelligence. To me it’s like giving a test in English to a Spanish speaking person and expecting the results to be accurate. Thank you for your comment and your work!

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      • Hi mom, thank you for commenting! Those people have definitely inspired me to continue searching for more, just like Henry. It is so amazing to discover all these people finding a way to unlock the intelligence their bodies hold ransom from the world! I am grateful to you and your son in sharing Henry’s journey of communication. I have discovered this great list, which you just might want to add a few names for yourself. Give it a look at: http://faithhopeloveautism.blogspot.com/p/blog-page_11.html

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      • Oops, I forgot to mention an interesting point. It is against California Law to test African Americans’ IQ to determine special ed placement, since it was determined to be discriminatory. Currently, there seems to be forming a great hope for more nonverbal students and advocates to continue to speak out against the denial of education given to them.

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    • Energy of autism order kills too many teachers from continuing to access learning and instead they give baby work year after year with mind numbing results. I am totally glad that you are trying to help autistic kids realize their potential. Denial of proper education has killed the souls of far too many who rot until death releases them from world’s prison. Keep going with the RPM it will save lives. Order yourself to my coordination of autism blogging and I will try to help if I can.

      ~ Henry

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      • Keep talking Henry and thank you for the encouragement! My dream would be to provide the tools necessary for them to communicate as you do and some day have them start their own blogs and maybe write you themselves. I will try to update you as to their status.

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  2. Dear Henry,
    Spencer just brought up your blog , and I found it very interesting. You explain your thoughts very clearly , and I`m happy that you have this method of communication. I`ll be looking forward to reading your future comments.
    Love and Best Wishes,
    Ba Ba Lodge

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