Non Verbal Autism

All people communicate but not everyone talks. Some people talk a little but not conversationally. Some people say words and phrases out loud that don’t match what they really want to say.

Sometimes I use talking words but I am still very much non verbal. Saying words out loud is not always possible or accurate for me. My pronunciation of words isn’t totally clear, and I say words in different order than most people when I say them. I can very much more fully express myself using the letter board, or Proloquo2Go.

Many times I say nonsensical things like, “Larry boy!” or “Go back to green house!” and I repeat it many times for no reason. I hear myself and think, boy, I sound ridiculous; and I wish I could stop but I have no control.

When people ask me things I know exactly what I want to say, but there is an ever-present blockade between my brain and my mouth. It is extremely frustrating as you can imagine.

Especially damning are the assumptions that my intelligence is low because of my thwarted attempts to respond the way others expect; with verbal words. I can remember a time when a person said to Mom that I have a very low IQ of 40, and I wanted to scream, NO! But I couldn’t. It was horrible not to be able to defend myself.

I sincerely, altruistically, hope and pray that more autism pros like teachers and doctors will realize that autism causes major issues with getting the body to cooperate with the intentions of the brain to respond, but ability to comprehend is unaffected. This will make way for more appropriate help for autistics.

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Storm the castle

Autism is totally great to have if you have supportive family, and friends, and teachers.  I have all of those, I am very blessed.

Keeping a positive outlook and fostering good habits are helpful for autistic people to feel competent. When you give responsibilities to autistic kids, you encourage them in pursuing their potential, not remaining stagnant.

I have learned to do a lot of things with loving guidance from mom and teachers. They know I have talent and potential, even though I have challenges too.  I appreciate that they assume I’m competent.

For example, my mom has taught me to put away clean dishes and take out garbage to help my family.  She thinks I’m responsible enough and trusts me.  Sometimes it takes a long time to learn new tasks but she keeps me going. Teachers have helped me to learn to cope with challenges by never letting me give up even when I’m difficult.

So, if you love someone who is autistic keep storming the castle of their potential and you will reap the rewards.